Things We Like – Industrial Architecture

This weeks Things We Like theme Industrial Architecture was chosen by Mila for its versatility. Rightfully so, the group came up with a range of choices including: industrial spaces that are in use today, buildings that were repurposed from old industry, and elements of design inspired by industry.

becker-architekten-hydro-plantMargaret’s Pick: Becker Architekten’s Hydroelectric Plant, Kempten, Germany. Margaret appreciates the way the plant is integrated with the urban fabric, and wonders  if this kind of project would work for Cambridge, Ontario.

maishama-waste-treatmentJohn’s Pick: Maishama Waste Incineration Plant, Osaka, Japan. This fanciful building was designed by Austrian architect Hundertwasser, who protested the uniformity of Bauhaus architecture.

water-millDee’s Pick: Water Mills. Dee finds beauty in the balance between simplicity and complexity in a water mill. She also enjoys the way many towns and cities were once built up around a mill.

hale-county-animal-shelterAshley’s Pick: Hale County Animal Shelter, Alabama. Ashley shared Rural Studio’s project, an animal shelter built using industrial design methods such as a lamella system for the roof structure.

rotterdam-crane-lightsMatt’s Pick: Lighting in Schouwburgplein, Rotterdam. These unique positionable light fixtures are inspired by the cranes in this port city and can be moved to illuminate the many different events and installations that are hosted in the square.

union-stationMonica’s Pick: Union Station, Toronto. Monica is impressed by the functionality of Union Station’s spaces, throughout all the many renovations and iterations.

Jamil’s Pick: Chameleon House, Michigan. This single family home designed by architects Anderson Anderson features elements of industrial design on both the exterior and interior.

Mila’s Picks: Mila shared two entries with us this week; The Fagus Factory, Germany (Left) and the Danish National Maritime Museum (Right). Mila appreciates the historical significance of the Fagus Factory as an important example of early modern architecture. She also loves the way that the Maritime Museum was built around a former dry dock

Things We Like – Record Breakers

For many of us, the month of January becomes a time to reflect on our habits and make resolutions. I’ve always found it interesting to ask people about their resolutions. Whether they stick to them or not, we can gain an insight into people by knowing the goals the dawn of a new year inspires within them.

Over the past year JMA has engaged in an office wide resolution that has become a Friday afternoon ritual. (No – we haven’t been having a Biggest Loser competition.) Any visitor to JMA knows that our office is a bustling place and we value the time to bounce loose ideas off of one another, without judgement. With this in mind came the invention of “Things We Like”, an open discussion about creativity, innovation, and design. Everybody participates and nothing is off limits, as long as you like it!

The idea is simple – at the beginning of each week one member of the JMA team is selected to pick a theme. The theme can be anything; past Fridays we’ve taken a serious look at topics such as Humanitarian Design, Urban Planning, and Intentionally Green Buildings. Other weeks we’ve taken a whimsical approach to Things We Like and gathered to discuss Fictional Architecture or Beds. Once the topic is chosen each member of JMA has the rest of the week to ponder the theme and choose a response to share that they personally enjoy. When Friday afternoon rolls around we convene and have a Things We Like “show and tell”. Each person presents their choice and we use it as a tipping point for open discussion. The conversation it inspires is always informative…and entertaining!

During the most recent round of Things We Like I was the lucky one chosen to pick the theme. I decided upon Record Breakers. After enduring many Evil Knievel jokes throughout the week everyone chose a Record Breaker they like. Check out our entries below. As always, the range in each person’s interpretation of the theme and ideas to discuss was fascinating.

Dee Hopkins

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Monica’s Pick: NASA Vehicle Assembly Building, Titusville, Florida. Largest single story building in the world.

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Jamil’s Pick: 432 Park Avenue, New York City, New York. Tallest residential building in the world.

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John’s Pick: The Crystal Palace, (destroyed) formerly London, England. In 1851 The Crystal Palace broke the record for the greatest area of glass ever seen in a building at the time.

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Ashley’s Pick: World’s Largest Windchime, Casey, Illinois.

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Matt’s Pick: Bullitt Centre, Seattle, Washington. The greenest commercial building in the world.

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Margaret’s Pick: Villard de Honnecourt’s Sketchbook, Picardy, France. Some of the earliest found true architectural drawings.

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Mila’s Pick: Millau Viaduct, Millau, France. Tallest bridge in the world.

capital-gate

Dee’s Pick: Capital Gate, Abu Dhabi, UAE. World’s furthest leaning man made tower.

Expect more Things We Like blogs in coming weeks!

A Taste of Berlin 1916 – Holiday Potluck

The JMA team, along with friends both old and new, gathered together to take a culinary journey through time during our annual holiday potluck. This year, rather than looking to the far corners of the world for recipes, we crafted dishes that would have been made right here in Kitchener 100 years ago. For the uninitiated, 1916 was the very year that the citizens of Kitchener voted on the city’s name change from Berlin. Wartime tensions lead to the decision to change the city name and other options on the ballot included Brock, Keowana, Adanac (Canada spelled backwards), Corona, and Benton.

Our celebration of our local history was heavily inspired by the city’s German and Pennsylvanian Dutch roots. As one of the party attendees exclaimed while laying eyes on our holiday feast, “Wow, thats a lot of meat and potatoes!”

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The historic recipes on offer included fresh homemade bread, hearty soups and curried sausage, delicate minced pies, and festive jellied aspics. All of this was topped off by a main course that could only be described as decadent, featuring both a roast goose and a duck. (Here at the office we enjoyed the leftovers for the following week!) Each contributor had a lively story to tell about how they selected their recipe, and then made their own adjustments, often cheating to add ingredients that were likely sparse in wartime era Kitchener.

The holiday potluck was a major hit and a wonderful way to kick off the holiday season and enjoy each others company. The JMA team wishes you all a happy holiday and a safe and prosperous New Year as we head into 2017!

Old Fashion Tomato Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

6 large vine-ripened tomatoes
2 small yellow cooking onions
6 cloves of garlic (whole)
½ cup olive oil (for roasting tomatoes, onions and garlic)
dash of oregano
4 cups chicken stock
4 tablespoons butter
¾ cup heavy cream
salt & sugar to taste

Instructions:

1. Cut tomatoes and onions in half, roast with olive oil, oregano and add garlic in oven at 450 degrees until caramelized.
2. Boil chicken stock until reduced to 1/3 of the original liquid, add butter, cream and simmer on low heat.
3. Crush or blend tomatoes and onions, combine with chicken stock mixture.
4. Add sugar and salt to taste.
5. Simmer on low/medium heat & reduce to desired consistency.
6. Serve warm and enjoy!

For more information on the culinary history of Kitchener check out www.ryeandginger.ca

The South China Sea Holiday Potluck

Okay, so the holidays are over, but we are still reminiscing on the details of our Christmas party last month. If you are familiar with our firm then you probably know about the annual John MacDonald Architect holiday potluck party. For the past 20 years our Christmas Potluck has had a worldly theme; this year the festivities where inspired by the South China Sea. Attendees could select any country that coasts the sea to create a traditional dish. The main countries represented in this year’s meal were China, Vietnam, Malaysia and, the Philippines. 

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The party always starts with a welcoming beverage; this year’s drink was a mango daiquiri. The rum that was on hand to make this drink was 65% proof, so the amount put into the drink should have been cut back, of course that didn’t happen. Needless to say, the first sips of the daiquiri were strong and more mango and ice was added to try to tone down the rum taste, with little success. While still delicious, we only had one round of this slushy drink.

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This year the meal started with some “lighter” appetizers, included Pilipino spring rolls, banh mi (Vietnamese sandwiches), and spicy prawn and scallop satays. The appetizers where gone in no time, and most of us were satisfied before we even started the entreés. A light and fresh tasting hot and sour shrimp soup then kicked off the main course.

Before we dug into our meal, the usual round table explanation of ingredients and cooking method was presented by each chef. The main course consisted of the best-ever sticky asian ribs, bbq chicken, stew, chicken skewers with peanut sauce, grilled asparagus and rice. This year’s mains were a bit heavy on the meat, but all very delicious. The flavours complemented each other extremely well, with hints of lime, ginger, and turmeric, helping to bring each dish together on one plate.

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Next up; Dessert! This year there was a lot of sweet treats to choose from. There were two flavours of home made ice cream; roasted coconut and star of anise, both could be accompanied with either a banana sticky rice or the tapioca pudding, or each could stand alone. With full bellies we ended the evening chatting and dividing the left-over up to take home for lunch the next day.

JMA Massassauga Camping Trip II

The Second Annual JMA Canoeing Adventure officially began in the parking lot beside our office. It was a Friday morning in early August, when 5 adventurers – John, Margaret, Matthew, A.J.(me) and Michelle – embarked on a two night, three day journey into the great outdoors. Northbound from Kitchener, they crossed the country in two trusty Toyota’s arriving at Pete’s Point in Massassauga Provincial Park in the early afternoon. After the canoes were rented and loaded, they embarked upon the second leg of the journey, across the water and into the wilderness. The weather was outstanding. We managed to make it to our site in 2 or so hours despite a slight head wind, and break for a dip part way.

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The Campsite, located deep in the Massassauga Archipelago was full of possibilities, complete with a slowly rising shelf of Precambrian Shield for swimming, two great tent clearings, a bathroom box in the woods with a view of a beautiful grotto like brooke, a grill for the fire and a leaky teapot someone had left for us. After the tents were set up, John and I set out to get some extra fuel (wood). We found a dead tree and set about harvesting the better part of the top third bringing it back to site in the canoe. John made a roaring fire which died down into a nice bed of coals upon which he cooked 4 very nice, very large pieces of top sirloin beef. The Friday feast was completed with corn, eggplant and peppers, salad and grilled pineapple and peaches, poached in rum.

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On Saturday morning, after a few of us took a dip, we prepared breakfast. Using Margaret’s large paella pan, we cooked a pound of bacon, and then (with a lot of the grease sizzling away still in the pan) we made peach pancakes. The trick with peach pancakes is to bring instant pancake mix and canned peaches. Chop the peaches in the can, then add with the juice into the pancake mix. We had terrific results and will likely recycle the recipe for the Third Annual JMA Canoe Adventure.

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Despite a soft rain we embarked on a trip to Wreck Island, known for its geology and outstanding swimming. The water was very flat and the rain kept us cool as we paddled to the very edge of the archipelago. Upon our arrival the skies began to part and we enjoyed a very sunny picnic on the island. The picnic featured three types of sandwiches, a genoa salami with spinach and dijon mustard on a healthy artisanal multi-grain, a hummus wrap with roast veggies, and a cucumber sandwich on a light rye with fresh dill and lemon cream cheese.

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After a refreshing swim under a very blue sky we pushed off again, bound for our camp site. The paddle home was long under a hot sun. We had a delicious chili with avocado and buns for dinner. The evening was spent by the fire with smores, and jokes and laughs.

IMG_6262Sunday morning was filled with relaxing and intermittent packing. At noon we said farewell to the campsite and, with a breeze at our back we leisurely paddled back to the launching docks. After dropping off the canoes we headed back south to civilization. We stopped for Ice Cream in Mactier and continued to snake through the country avoiding the Muskoka traffic. For the final meal of the weekend we enjoyed a high class affair at the Whistle Stop in Beaton. In various levels of grunginess we five adventurers savoured the fabulous meal before we finished the drive into the sunset and home to Kitchener.

St. Thomas Community Recycling Centre – PIC

What is a PIC? A Public Information Centre is a communication tool used to share information with the public, as a group in one place, regarding a specific topic.2015-05-06 17.08.58copy On Wednesday, May 6th, 2015, JMA presented and facilitated a PIC for the City of St. Thomas’ Community Recycling Centre held at the City Hall. The purpose of this PIC was to present the community with the proposed project design and to receive comments and concerns regarding the project. To accomplish the task at hand JMA produced the following:

  • 9 presentation boards to be displayed around the room, highlighting the facility design, operations and specific aspects of the project which were deemed important for design decisions;
  • comment sheets with specific questions for the public’s participation;
  • a presentation of the project’s development and proposed design to date.

Welcome The first section of the PIC was an ‘open house’ for the public to browse the presentation boards and converse with the design team one-on-one. The second section was the presentation, projected large on the wall and presented by the design team (John MacDonald, David Smith and Ashley Jardin). The third and last section was a question and answer period where the public had free range to lead the discussion. Site Design The project was well received and the public turn-out and participation was excellent.

DesignStorm

Everyone knows about brainstorming, but have you ever heard of DesignStorming? This is a technique we use often at John MacDonald Architect (JMA). It helps to explore the infinite possibilities of a particular project by compiling solutions from different designers with different approaches and styles.

Our most recent DesignStorm was undertaken for a lighting project here in our office. Each designer was presented with the existing situation, which was 3 fluorescent light fixtures that run the length of our office. Designers where then given the task; these large, long lights required some form of stylish covering.

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Existing condition of light fixtures

There where 6 designer and 4 days where given to prepare before each designer presented their idea. The process was to, come-up with a design, consider how to implement that design, create a short presentation and present it to the other designers and office. It is surprising the range of creativity and designs that where presented. See below for all 6 designs:

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Lighting design 1 – Canopy

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Lighting Design 2 – Colour Wave

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Lighting Design 3 – Reflecting Arc

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Lighting Design 4 – Backdrop

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Lighting Design 5 – Light Wall

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Lighting Design 6 – Unfurl

At JMA we believe that exploring several options and approaches is the key to successful results. We have done DesignStorms for several projects large and small, from a 3000 sq. ft. house to an office redesign, to a little cottage kitchen renovation. The results are always promising and a variety of resolutions are presented, but we call it a DesignStorm and not a Design Competition, because the final design is alway some form of mixing the designs into one, creating the very best possible solution. It is really a process that helps the client see the possibilities and to select the elements that best suite them and their needs.

The final design for our office fluorescent light fixtures, wrapping the outside of the fixture with a canvas material and caping the ends with a custom wood piece, keeping the feeling of openness between the main room and storage room. The final product is a tribute to the Canopy and Backdrop designs, merged into a new design that is practical, functional and attractive.

Lighting Final